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In the news release, Medal of Honor Recipient Jon R. Cavaiani Passes Away at 70, issued 29-Jul-2014 by Congressional Medal of Honor Society over PR Newswire, we are advised by the organization that the subheadline should read, "Earned Nation's Highest Award for Valor during Vietnam", rather than "Korea" as originally issued inadvertently. The complete, corrected release follows:

Medal of Honor Recipient Jon R. Cavaiani Passes Away at 70

Earned Nation's Highest Award for Valor during Vietnam

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C., July 29, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Congressional Medal of Honor Society announces that Sergeant Major Jon R. Cavaiani, Medal of Honor recipient, passed away Tuesday, July 29, 2014 in Stanford, California at age 70.

He was awarded the Medal of Honor, the highest award given to those who acted with uncommon, selfless courage, by President Gerald Ford on December 12, 1974.

Born August 2, 1943 in Royston, U.K. Cavaiani's parents emigrated to the U.S. in 1947. He became a naturalized citizen in 1968 shortly before he joined the Army where he served with the 5(th) Special Forces Group. While defending a secret radio site deep in enemy territory from an enemy attack, he rallied his platoon and fought until helicopters were called to remove the soldiers. He voluntarily stayed on the ground with a recovered machine-gun and covered their withdrawal before being captured and serving 23 months in a Vietnamese P.O.W. camp. He was released after the war. He retired from the Army after 31 years in 1990 at the rank of Sergeant Major.

Funeral services are pending. There are 79 recipients alive today.

About the Congressional Medal of Honor Society

The Congressional Medal of Honor Society was chartered by Congress in 1958 and consists exclusively of the living recipients of our nation's highest award for bravery in combat, the Medal of Honor. Those who wear this light blue ribbon and Medal around their neck are "recipients" of this prestigious award; they are not "winners." Although it is common to refer to the Medal as the Congressional Medal of Honor, it is simply named the Medal of Honor, although, as stated, the Congress did establish the Society as the Congressional Medal of Honor Society.

Contact: Victoria Kueck
843-884-8862
medalhq@earthlink.net

SOURCE Congressional Medal of Honor Society